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World Logic Day

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Today is World Logic Day. Created by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), it was first celebrated in 2019. Held annually on January 14th, World Logic Day was established to “bring the intellectual history, conceptual significance and practical implications of logic to the attention of interdisciplinary science communities and the broader public.” The celebration aims at fostering international cooperation, promoting the development of logic, in both research and teaching, supporting the activities of associations, universities and other institutions involved with logic, and enhancing public understanding of logic and its implications for science, technology and innovation.  According to Audrey Azoulay, Director General of UNESCO, the date of of January 14th was selected in honour of two great logicians of the twentieth century: Kurt Gödel and Alfred Tarski. Gödel, who died on 14 January 1978, established the incompleteness theorem, which transformed the study of logic in the twentieth century. Tarski, who was born on 14 January 1901, developed theories which interacted with those of Gödel. There’s some more information about the day here. For World Logic Day I’ve gathered some logic-related posts from over the past few years at Daily Nous, starting with this: Portraits of Logicians by Matt Leadbetter These drawings of logicians, initially posted about here, are by Matt Leadbetter. They were commissioned by the Open Logic Project, the home of a collaborative, open source, “remixable” logic text. Speaking of logic texts, you may want to check out Jonathan Weisberg’s Odds & Ends  and David Manley’s Reason Better. Many laypersons think of logic as a tool, and don’t realize it is an object of research and development, so it might be worth sharing, on World Logic Day, “The Enduring Evolution of Logic,” a guest post by Thomas Ferguson and Graham Priest. Some. . .

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News source: Daily Nous

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