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Semantic Singularities: Paradoxes of Reference, Predication, and Truth

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2019.10.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Keith Simmons, Semantic Singularities: Paradoxes of Reference, Predication, and Truth, Oxford University Press, 2018, 249pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198791546. Reviewed by Roy T. Cook, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Keith Simmons' book continues his development and defense of a contextualist solution to the semantic paradoxes, one begun inhis earlier monograph Universality and the Liar (1993). According to (this more recent version of) Simmons' account, we avoid the Liar paradox (and a wealth of other semantic puzzles involving truth, denotation, and predicate extension) by noting that the extension of the truth predicate is context-dependent, and hence, as we reason about the Liar, this context shifts in various ways, resulting in the extension of the truth predicate shifting likewise. For the sake of simplicity, I am going to restrict my summary and comments mostly to Simmons' treatment of the Liar and related constructions involving truth and falsity. Applications of the singularity... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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