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Phantasia in Aristotle's Ethics: Reception in the Arabic, Greek, Hebrew and Latin Traditions

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2019.07.17 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jakob Leth Fink (ed.), Phantasia in Aristotle's Ethics: Reception in the Arabic, Greek, Hebrew and Latin Traditions, Bloomsbury, 2019, 175pp., $114.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781350028005. Reviewed by Stephen R. Ogden, The Catholic University of America This is an interesting collection which features three nested levels of increasing focus: the ancient and medieval reception of Aristotle's Ethics; the psychological notion of phantasia (often translated as "imagination") within that reception; and, most specifically and principally, how phantasia may (or may not) play a role in Nicomachean Ethics (NE) 6.5, especially 1140b17-18. This passage states that the moral "principle does not immediately appear (euthus ou phainetai archē) to the person who has been corrupted by pleasure or pain" (transl. from the editor, Jakob Leth Fink, p. 2). Since the moral principle here is the goal or end (to hou heneka, 1140b16-17), Iacopo Costa in his chapter helpfully labels this key text the "goal's destruction (or disappearance) passage (GDP)" (p. 80). I... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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