Top News, Articles, and Interviews in Philosophy

Time Management

I’m planning to run a workshop for graduate students on how to manage time, both the time when there’s never enough time and the stretches of time when there is all the time in the world (like a sabbatical). I’m still working on this, so let me run it by you all. Maybe you have … Continue reading Time [More]

Sexual Harassment in Philosophy (guest post by Janice Dowell and David Sobel)

The following is a guest post* by Janice Dowell and David Sobel, professors of philosophy at Syracuse University. It is also posted at PEA Soup. Sexual Harassment in Philosophy by Janice Dowell and David Sobel Our aim in this short post is to provide a brief summary of the general picture of sexual harassment as it applies to the academic community and to philosophy in particular. In a follow-up post, we will offer a number of proposals for how departments and individuals can act to fight harassment and support victims. Some of those proposals will no doubt seem controversial to some. Understanding why those proposals are warranted will require first understanding the extent and repercussions of harassment. We need to understand that we as philosophers and teachers operate in a world in which sexual harassment is not rare. This recognition should be reflected in our practice, and two points are especially important. First, philosophers are well aware both of the multiple ways in which language communicates information and of the effects of language that extend beyond communication. So, we should be particularly alive to such considerations in the language we use for teaching and discussing philosophy. When we casually and unnecessarily offer examples involving rape, sexual harassment, or false accusations of either, we should be aware of how probable it is that some audience members, readers, or fellow discussants will have been sexually harassed or assaulted and [More]

Campos Wins Brian Barry Prize

Andre Santos Campos, a research fellow and assistant professor at the Nova Institute of Philosophy at Nova University of Lisbon, has won the 2019 Brian Barry Prize in Political Science. Dr. Campos won the prize for his essay, “Representing the Future: The Interests of Future Persons in Representative Democracy.” The prize is awarded by the British Academy in partnership with Cambridge University Press and the British Journal of Political Science, in which the winning essay will be published. Created in 2014, the prize honors the late Brian Barry, well-known for his work in political and moral philosophy, and who was a founding editor of the journal and a distinguished fellow of the British Academy. As Dr. Campos notes, “Brian Barry was one of the first major political theorists to bring attention to the challenges posed by intergenerational justice to contemporary liberal democracies, especially concerning the future. This is undoubtedly one of the most pressing areas of research in political studies nowadays.” He adds, “To be able to contribute to it with my own research while following Professor Brian Barry’s footsteps is a privilege I accept as carrying great responsibility.” You can read more about this prize, and see a list of previous winners, here.   The post Campos Wins Brian Barry Prize appeared first on Daily [More]

Is there any way to escape an endless loop of "why"? Like when I was a kid I

Read another response about Science, Knowledge Science Knowledge Share Is there any way to escape an endless loop of "why"? Like when I was a kid I constantly asked my parents how something works and then it went to why something works. After they responded then it went to another why that went deeper and so on and so on. Similarily we can endlessly ask 'why' on matters like oughts of with what hand should I hold fork or on which hand should I wear a watch etc. So is there a way to escape it? Something like fact about ourselves comes to mind (i.e. because I want to do so) but that seems trivial or problematic in some areas [More]