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Earning Faculty Buy-in with SAM (Simplify, Automate and Motivate) Part 1

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I am presenting at an assessment conference on March 26th and hence needed to have a presentation. As an epic challenge, I tried to work some philosophy into assessment. Here is the first part of the presentation:   The Challenge One fundamental challenge of assessment is earning faculty buy in for the process. Failure to achieve this can have a range of negative consequences. One area of negative consequences is in the realm of data. If faculty buy-in is not earned, they are more likely to provide incomplete assessment data or even no data at all. They are also more likely to provide low-quality data and might even provide fabricated data to simply get the process over with. De-motivated faculty will tend to provide garbage data and, as the old saying goes, garbage in, garbage out. A second area of negative consequences is in closing the assessment loop. Even if faculty provide adequate data, without buy-in they are more likely to neglect the other parts of the process such as their improvement narratives, reflections, and applying these results to their classes. Because of this, earning quality faculty buy-in is part of the foundation of assessment. Fortunately, there are ways to help earn the participation of faculty in the process and these include the SAM method. This involves Simplifying the assessment process, Automating the assessment process, and Motivating faculty. I will begin with Simplification.   Simplification A complicated assessment process is analogous to the tax code or the Windows Registry. This is to say that it is problematic, convoluted, torturous, difficult, and inconsistent. Dealing with such a process often requires special knowledge of all its difficult ways. Even with such knowledge, errors are likely and there are often punitive aspects to such processes that can create adversarial relationships. Complicated processes often have a random element as well—one can never be quite sure how the process will work this time around. As. . .

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News source: A Philosopher's Blog

Hobbes's On The Citizen: A Critical Guide

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2021.03.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Robin Douglass and Johan Olsthoorn (eds.), Hobbes's On The Citizen: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2020, 251pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781108421980. Reviewed by Sandra Leonie Field, Yale-NUS College, Singapore The perennial interest in the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes shows no sign of slowing down. The rush of edited volumes commemorating the 350th anniversary of the publication of his masterpiece Leviathan (1651) has been followed by a steady stream of collections guided by various themes -- Hobbes and the law, feminist interpretations of Hobbes, Hobbes and religion, Hobbes's contemporary relevance -- as well as new general companion volumes every number of years. Robin Douglass and Johan Olsthoorn's book nonetheless makes a distinctive and welcome contribution not addressed by any of the previous volumes. It seeks to determine the political philosophy of Hobbes's less well known book De Cive (1642/1647; referred to throughout the volume as On the Citizen). Although Douglass and Olsthoorn's volume... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

The Problem of Other Minds: The Aesthetic Solution

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In epistemology the problem of the external world is the challenge of proving that I can know that there are entities that exist other than me. Even if it is assumed that there is an external world, there remains the problem of other minds: the challenge of proving that I can know that there is at least one other being that has a mind. The common version of this problem tends to start with the assumption that other beings exist, and the challenge is to prove that I can know that these other beings have minds (or lack minds). Our good dead friend Descartes offered the best-known effort to solve the problem of the external world and in trying to solve this problem he also, perhaps unintentionally, attempted to solve the problem of other minds. In his Meditations Descartes set out to create an infallible foundation of knowledge by his method of doubting his beliefs until he found a belief he could not doubt.  As part of this project, he hoped to solve the problem of the external world. After his doubting spree in the first Meditation, he took his belief that he thinks and the belief that he exists to be certain and indubitable.  In trying to prove that something exists other than him, Descartes attempts to prove that God exists—that is, he attempted to solve the problem of the external world by solving a version of the problem of other minds. Proving that God exists would prove that another mind exists, thus solving a limited version of each problem. While Descartes grinds through a plethora of proofs, his key reasoning for the purposes of this essay is his notion that the cause of a belief must contain as much reality as the belief itself. Roughly put, you can think of this reasoning as analogous to reasoning that whatever charged a mobile phone battery must have at least as much power as in in the battery (assuming the battery charged from zero). Descartes based this reasoning on the principle that something cannot arise from nothing. Roughly put, Descartes claimed. . .

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News source: A Philosopher's Blog

The Ethics of Capitalism: An Introduction

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2021.03.03 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Daniel Halliday and John Thrasher, The Ethics of Capitalism: An Introduction, Oxford University Press, 2020, 288pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190096205. Reviewed by Marco Meyer, University of Hamburg When teaching seminars on political philosophy, I have sometimes found a fundamental disconnect between my teaching and the expectations of my students. My courses are about tax justice, climate change mitigation, or ethics in finance. Yet some of my students are not convinced that addressing injustices in these areas within a capitalist system can ever amount to much. Is capitalism so deeply rotten, they wonder, that tweaking it misses the bigger picture? Daniel Halliday and John Thrasher's book addresses this question head on. The authors have done a great service to teachers of political philosophy and political economy by writing an accessible introduction to political economy from a philosophical perspective. They focus on the question whether capitalism can have moral foundations.... Read More

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

SHAPE today and tomorrow: Q&A with Sophie Goldsworthy and Julia Black (part two)

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SHAPE (Social Sciences, Arts, and Humanities for People and the Economy) research helps us to make sense of the past, to inform the present, and develop a vision for the future. Considering the last year alone in which the vital work of STEM researchers in developing vaccines and treating COVID-19 has been closely followed across the globe, it is also important to acknowledge that SHAPE research has played an important role in our response to the pandemic. From considering ethics to inform how vaccines should be allocated amongst the population, to looking back at the societal and economic impact of pandemics through history, SHAPE research has provided us with valuable insights across a vast spectrum of different areas.This second part of our Q&A with Sophie Goldsworthy, Director of Content Strategy & Acquisitions at OUP, and Professor Julia Black CBE FCA, Strategic Director of Innovation and Professor of Law at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and President-elect of the British Academy, reflects on how SHAPE disciplines can help us to understand the impact of the events of the pandemic and look towards the future of SHAPE.In part one of our Q&A with Sophie Goldsworthy and Professor Julia Black, they introduce SHAPE and what it means to them—if you missed it, you can read it here.In the current context of the coronavirus pandemic, how can SHAPE subjects help us make sense of how the last year has impacted us and the world in which we live?Sophie Goldsworthy: The last year has been testing in many ways. But we might turn to SHAPE subjects as we start to evaluate what life looks like after the pandemic, assessing the human impact, finding new ways to connect, and working out how to salvage the best of what we have been left with.SHAPE subjects can help us start to understand where we are now and drive innovative solutions. We can draw on what these subjects tell us as we endeavour to improve on the inclusivity of our virtual. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

Deontic Logic

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[Revised entry by Paul McNamara and Frederik Van De Putte on March 11, 2021. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html, supplement.html] Deontic logic[1] is a branch of logic that has been the most concerned with the contribution that the following sorts of notions make to what follows from what (or what supports what, more generally):[2]...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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