Top News, Articles, and Interviews in Philosophy

Philosophy of Economics

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[Revised entry by Daniel M. Hausman on September 4, 2018. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] "Philosophy of Economics" consists of inquiries concerning (a) rational choice, (b) the appraisal of economic outcomes, institutions and processes, and (c) the ontology of economic phenomena and the possibilities of acquiring knowledge of them. Although these inquiries overlap in many ways, it is useful to divide philosophy of economics in this way into three subject matters which can be regarded respectively as branches of action theory, ethics (or normative social and political philosophy), and philosophy of science. Economic...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

The Incommensurability of Scientific Theories

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[Revised entry by Eric Oberheim and Paul Hoyningen-Huene on September 4, 2018. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The term 'incommensurable' means 'to have no common measure'. The idea has its origins in Ancient Greek mathematics, where it meant no common measure between magnitudes. For example, there is no common measure between the lengths of the side and the diagonal of a square. Today, such incommensurable relations are represented by irrational numbers. The metaphorical application of this mathematical notion specifically to the relation between successive scientific theories became controversial in 1962 after it...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

John Locke's Political Philosophy and the Hebrew Bible

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2018.09.03 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Yechiel J. M. Leiter, John Locke's Political Philosophy and the Hebrew Bible, Cambridge University Press, 420pp., $135.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781108428187.  Reviewed by Victor Nuovo, Harris Manchester College, Oxford/Middlebury College The thesis of this book is that John Locke was a political Hebraist. Political Hebraism is a school of historical interpretation of recent origin whose purpose is to establish "a new theoretical course for understanding classical political ideas". It proposes nothing new in method, which is to recover the original meaning of these ideas by a historical-critical interpretation of the mostly modern texts in which they were first presented. What is new is the claim that the Hebrew Bible was regarded by the authors of these texts, who were major 17th-century European political thinkers, as a primary source of their ideas, which is to say, they were Political Hebraists. This book is a. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

Avoiding and handling burnout

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Last week was my university's first week of classes, and today is the Labor Day, which means we have the day off. Given that I have a MWF teaching schedule, this is a nice stroke of luck, as the sudden change of workload from summer break last week hit me like a ton of bricks. I usually don't have any problems with motivation, but to be honest I was already feeling pretty worn out...just one week into the academic year! I'll probably adapt to the change in a week or two, as it's always difficult to get back into the swing of things. But it got me thinking about something I was warned about during the tenure and promotion process at my university: burnout. This was something I was warned about several times, both during my 3-year review and the final tenure process--and by both my department and college T&P committees. Each time, the committees noted that I had taken on a lot of optional responsibilities beyond research and teaching, and they warned me to ease off. . .

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News source: The Philosophers' Cocoon

Query about canceling classes for campus visits

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In the comments section of our job-market discussion thread, Anon writes: ...I am extremely stressed out about applying from my current TT position. Suppose someone is teaching a MWF schedule and lands multiple on-campus interviews. The faculty member will likely have to miss a number of teaching days. What is one supposed to do in this situation? How is one supposed to explain multiple absences, especially at an institution where there are strict policies that discourage canceling class? Because this seems to be a common quandary (I've heard similar questions asked by many different people), I figured it might be good to gather answers to it in an independent thread. I'm not sure I have any good answers. Anyone have any helpful insight here?

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News source: The Philosophers' Cocoon

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