Top News, Articles, and Interviews in Philosophy

How feminism becomes a tool of neo-imperialism

Serene Khader explores the theory of "missionary feminism," a set of epistemic values that creates a filter for the Western world to view the situations of “other” non-Western world women, for gain. The post How feminism becomes a tool of neo-imperialism appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesIt’s not you, it’s me: the problem of incivility#MeToo and Mental Health: Gender Parity in the Field of PsychiatryLGBT Pride month timeline: The 50th anniversary of the Stonewall [More]

It’s not you, it’s me: the problem of incivility

We regularly decry this or that latest episode of incivility, and can thereby find temporary satisfaction. Maybe we feel heartened to see the uncivil criticized, the critique itself a reassurance that incivilities still meet some resistance. Maybe we find relief in collective condemnation of the uncivil, solidarity in shared disapproval. Or maybe we just experience […] The post It’s not you, it’s me: the problem of incivility appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesLGBT Pride month timeline: The 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprisingHow drawing pictures can help us understand wineMad Pride and the end of mental [More]

APA Is Surveying Philosophers on Priorities and Services

The American Philosophical Association (APA) is conducting a survey to determine which issues confronting professional philosophers it should prioritize, and which of its services and programs professional philosophers find valuable.  The survey is part of  a “strategic planning process to help guide the association over the next few years” and is “designed to gather insights from philosophers across the discipline, regardless of rank, employment, or APA membership status.” According to an email from the APA, “the survey will not attach your name to your responses, and all of the data will be reported in aggregate. As an incentive, after completing the survey, you will have the opportunity to enter a drawing for free APA membership for one year.” You can take the survey here. The post APA Is Surveying Philosophers on Priorities and Services appeared first on Daily [More]

New Journal: Philosophy and the Mind Sciences

A new academic journal, Philosophy and the Mind Sciences (PhiMiSci) will focus on “the interface between philosophy of mind, psychology, and cognitive neuroscience.” PhiMiSci is peer-reviewed and open-access. Its editors-in-chief are Sascha Benjamin Fink (Magdeburg), Wanja Wiese (Mainz), and Jennifer Windt (Monash). The first issue, for which manuscripts are currently under review, will be a special issue on “radical disruptions of self-consciousness.” While the editors anticipate other occasional special issues, they write that after the publication of the inaugural issue, “accepted articles will be published whenever peer-review and revisions have been successfully completed.” You can learn more about the journal, including its editorial board, here. (via John Schwenkler at Brains) The post New Journal: Philosophy and the Mind Sciences appeared first on Daily [More]

PhilPapers Publishes Its First Book

In a move that may signal disruptive changes to academic philosophy publishing, PhilPapers, the free, massive, online philosophy database, has published its first book—an open-access edited collection. It’s The Open Handbook of Formal Epistemology, edited by Richard Pettigrew (Bristol) and Jonathan Weisberg (Toronto), and it features the following contributions: “Precise Credences”, by Michael G. Titelbaum “Decision Theory”, by Johanna Thoma “Imprecise Probabilities”, by Anna Mahtani “Primitive Conditional Probabilities”, by Kenny Easwaran “Infinitesimal Probabilities”, by Sylvia Wenmackers “Comparative Probabilities”, by Jason Konek “Belief Revision Theory”, by Hanti Lin “Ranking Theory”, by Franz Huber “Full & Partial Belief”, by Konstantin Genin “Doxastic Logic”, by Michael Caie “Conditionals”, by R. A. Briggs Weisberg, who was one of the creators of the open-access philosophy journal, Ergo, and who suggested the idea of the book to the PhilPapers, says that a second edition of the book may include more articles. In a post about the book at his site, Weisberg writes: “For me personally, a central aim of this project was to demonstrate a point about open access publishing and shared standards. The budget for this book was exactly $0.00, and this was only possible because we didn’t need a human typesetter.” This was possible because “Pretty much everyone in formal epistemology uses the same, standardized format to do their writing. And [More]

Michel Foucault on the insane, the criminals, and the sexual deviants

Michel Foucault (1926-84) was one of the most influential and notable French philosophers and historians of ideas, best known for his theories on discourses and the relation of power and knowledge. His seminal works such as L’histoire de la folie à l’âge classique (1972, trs. as History of Madness, 2006), Surveiller et punir (1975, trs. as Discipline and Punish, 1977), and Histoire […] The post Michel Foucault on the insane, the criminals, and the sexual deviants appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesQuiz: How well do you know Albert Camus?Albert Camus and the problem of absurdityFour remarkable LGBTQ [More]

Albert Camus and the problem of absurdity

Albert Camus (1913-1960) was a French philosopher and novelist whose works examine the alienation inherent in modern life and who is best known for his philosophical concept of the absurd. He explored these ideas in his famous novels, The Stranger (1942), The Plague (1947), and The Fall (1956), as well as his philosophical essays, The Myth of Sisyphus (1942) and The Rebel (1951). […] The post Albert Camus and the problem of absurdity appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesThe Mysterious Case of the Disappearing ExistentialistImitation in literature: inspiration or plagiarism?Should the people always get what they want from their [More]

How Rabindranath Tagore reshaped Indian philosophy and literature

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) was a highly prolific Indian poet, philosopher, writer, and educator who wrote novels, essays, plays, and poetic works in colloquial Bengali. He was a key figure of the Bengal Renaissance, a cultural nationalist movement in the city. The post How Rabindranath Tagore reshaped Indian philosophy and literature appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesPhilosopher of The Month: William James (timeline)Celebrating notable women in philosophy: Philippa FootPhilosopher of the month: Saint Thomas Aquinas [More]

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