Top News, Articles, and Interviews in Philosophy

Berggruen Prize Awarded to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

The winner of the 2019 Berggruen Prize for Philosophy and Culture has been awarded to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. This is the first time the award, established in 2016, has been bestowed to someone who is not an academic philosopher. The previous awardees of the $1 million prize were Charles Taylor (2016), Onora O’Neill (2017), and Martha Nussbaum (2018). The prize is awarded to “humanistic thinkers whose ideas have helped us find direction, wisdom and improved self-understanding in a world being rapidly transformed by social, technological, political, cultural and economic change.” Originally called “The Berggruen Philosophy Prize,” in 2017 the word “philosophy” was dropped from its name. The chair of the prize committee is philosopher Kwame Anthony Appiah (NYU). Justice Ginsberg, he says, “has been both a visionary and a strategic leader in securing equality, fairness, and the rule of law not only in the realm of theory, but in social institutions and the lives of individuals.” The prize is sponsored by the Berggruen Institute. (via The New York Times) The post Berggruen Prize Awarded to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg appeared first on Daily [More]

Lynch Wins 2019 NCTE George Orwell Award

Michael P. Lynch, Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of Connecticut, is the winner of the 2019 George Orwell Award for Distinguished Contribution to Honesty and Clarity in Public Language from the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).  The award “recognizes writers who have made outstanding contributions to the critical analysis of public discourse.” The NCTE states: The Orwell Award emphasizes the importance of honesty and clarity in public language, and Michael Patrick Lynch’s book Know-It-All Society: Truth and Arrogance in Political Culture reminds us that honesty and clarity is more than just listening to speakers behind a podium; honesty and clarity in public language also refers to how we interact every day with those around us. Lynch accessibly explores aspects around and within public language, including the ideas of how our convictions affect both our worldview and the resulting discourse, and how intellectual arrogance and intellectual humility shape our interactions with others. Relying of the frameworks of philosophers from Dewey to Montaigne to Socrates, Lynch offers us a path to consider for how we speak with and listen to others in our 21st century political landscape. The award was established in 1975. Previous winners include not just other academics, such as legal scholar and bioethicist Katie Watson (Northwestern) and David Greenberg (Rutgers), but also entertainers such as Jon Stewart, authors [More]

Philosopher Awarded £977K Grant for “Mindreading”

Philosopher Richard Moore, who will be moving to Warwick University from The Berlin School of Mind and Brain at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin next year, has been awarded a £977,000 (roughly $1,200,000) grant from the UK government to fund a project on “mindreading.” “Mindreading” here refers to our cognitive capacities related to predicting the behavior of others and attributing various mental states to them. According to Dr. Moore, the project “will conduct empirical and philosophical research on the developmental relationship between mindreading in communication in ontogeny, phylogeny, and in human history” The funding was in the form of a UK Research and Industry Future Leaders Fellowship from UK Research and Innovation, Those interested in the project and positions it may fund can follow Dr. Moore on Twitter at @CommunicatMind. The post Philosopher Awarded £977K Grant for “Mindreading” appeared first on Daily [More]

Elizabeth Anderson Wins MacArthur Fellowship

Elizabeth Anderson, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and John Dewey Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, is a recipient of a 2019 MacArthur Fellowship. The MacArthur Fellowships, informally referred to as “genius grants”, are unrestricted, no-strings-attached awards of $625,000, given to “talented individuals who have shown extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits and a marked capacity for self-direction.” The Fellowships are funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. There were 26 Fellows in the 2019 class. Professor Anderson is the only academic philosopher among them. The Foundation says: Elizabeth Anderson is a philosopher examining how evolving concepts of freedom and equality are experienced in our daily lives. She combines a high level of analytical rigor with a pragmatist methodology in her investigations of the ways various institutions, policies, and social practices structure relations among people and serve to promote or hinder conditions of democratic equality and human flourishing. In an extensive body of work, Anderson formulates principles based on empirical evidence about problems of practical importance and urgency—from the persistence of racial segregation to the authoritarian aspects of the modern workplace—instead of engaging in thought experiments or posing hypothetical questions about an ideal world. She has made pivotal [More]

Zack Selected as 2019 Romanell – Phi Beta Kappa Professor

Naomi Zack, professor of philosophy at Lehman College, City University of New York (CUNY), has been awarded the 2019 Romanell – Phi Beta Kappa Professorship. The award includes delivering three lectures open to the public, the opportunity to publish the lectures in the Romanell Lectures Series from Oxford University Press, and a prize of $7,500. It is given annually to scholars working in philosophy to recognize “not only distinguished achievement but also the recipient’s contribution or potential contribution to public understanding of philosophy.” The award was established in 1983 and is named in honor of Patrick Romanell, H.Y. Benedict Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas, El Paso, and his wife Edna Romanell. It is sponsored by the academic honor society Phi Beta Kappa. Professor Zack will be delivering her lectures at Lehman College. A press release about the award states: Dr. Zack has researched and written on a variety of topics, notably in the areas of race, political philosophy, feminism and disaster ethics. Her most recent book is titled Reviving the Social Compact: Inclusive Citizenship in an Age of Extreme Politics (2018). She has published nine books and edited five anthologies, including the Oxford Handbook on Philosophy and Race (2017). Dr. Zack recently joined the faculty at Lehman College, moving from the University of Oregon, to focus on the opportunity to teach undergraduate members of under-represented groups and support [More]

Kymlicka Wins SSHRC Gold Medal

Will Kymlicka, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Political Philosophy at Queen’s University, is this winner of the 2019 Gold Medal from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, Canada’s federal agency for the funding and promotion of research in those areas. The Gold Medal is the highest research honor among the SSHRC’s five “Impact Awards.” According to a press release from the SSHRC, the Gold Medal “is awarded to an individual whose sustained leadership, dedication and originality of thought have inspired students and colleagues alike.” The SSHRC cites Professor Kymlicka’s “groundbreaking work on the link between democracy and diversity has advanced knowledge on models of citizenship and social justice within multicultural societies,” but it is worth noting that Professor Kymlicka’s impact on political philosophy extends beyond his work on democracy, diversity, and multiculturalism, and trace back to his interventions in the liberalism-communitarian disputes of the 1980’s and his very influential textbook, Contemporary Political Philosophy: An Introduction (the first edition of which came out in 1991). You can learn recent awards from the SSHRC here. The post Kymlicka Wins SSHRC Gold Medal appeared first on Daily [More]

Philosopher’s Annual Selections

Philosopher’s Annual is “an attempt to pick the ten best articles of the year” in academic philosophy. Volume 38, covering articles from 2018, is about to be released. The ten articles in that volume are: Mark Alfano, J. Adam Carter & Marc Cheong, “Technological Seduction and Self-Radicalization,” from the Journal of the American Philosophical Association Jc Beall, “The Simple Argument for Subclassical Logic,” from Philosophical Issues Selim Berker, “The Unity of Grounding,” from Mind Guillermo Del Pinal, “Meaning, Modulation, and Context: A Multidimensional Semantics for Truth-Conditional Pragmatics,” from Linguistics and Philosophy Louise Hanson, “Moral Realism, Aesthetic Realism, and the Asymmetry Claim,” from Ethics Remco Heesen, “When Journal Editors Play Favorites,” from Philosophical Studies Matthias Jenny, “Counterpossibles in Science: The Case of Relative Computability,” from Noûs Dilip Ninan, “Quantification and Epistemic Modality,” from the Philosophical Review Amia Srinivasan, “The Aptness of Anger,” from the Journal of Political Philosophy  Kenneth Walden, “Practical Reason Not As Such,” from the Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy An attempt to compile a list of the best articles in philosophy is, the editors admit, “as simple to state as it is admittedly impossible to fulfill,” given the massive volume of publications in philosophy each year and the diversity of criteria that may be employed. The results are the work of [More]

Two Philosophers Make British Academy Book Award Shortlist

The British Academy, the UK’s national organization for the humanities and social sciences has released the shortlist of candidates for its 2019 Nayef Al-Rodhan Prize for Global Cultural Understanding. The £25,000 ($30,900) annual prize, established seven years ago, “rewards and celebrates the best works of non-fiction that have contributed to global cultural understanding and illuminate the interconnections and divisions that shape cultural identity worldwide,” according to an announcement from the British Academy. Six books made the shortlist, including two by philosophers: The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity (Profile Books) by Kwame Anthony Appiah  How the World Thinks: A Global History of Philosophy (Granta Books) by Julian Baggini The other books on the list are: A Fistful of Shells: West Africa from the Rise of the Slave Trade to the Age of Revolution (Allen Lane) by Toby Green Maoism: A Global History (Bodley Head) by Julia Lovell Remnants of Partition: 21 Objects from a Continent Divided (Hurst) by Aanchal Malhotra Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture (Verso) by Ed Morales There were originally 80 books under consideration for the prize. The president of the British Academy, Sir David Cannadine, says of the shortlisted books: Such rigorous, timely and original non-fiction writing provides the rich context the global community needs to discuss and debate present-day challenges. Each of the writers nominated for this year’s [More]

Philosophers Win ERC Starting Grants

The European Research Council (ERC) has announced the winners of its latest round of “starting grants,” and among them are several philosophers. They are: Rafał Banka, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, for Mereological Reconstruction of the Metaphysical System in the Daodejing (€229,500 / $252,600) Jonathan Birch, London School of Economics and Political Science, for Foundations of Animal Sentience (€1,500,000 / $1,652,000) Jason Konek, University of Bristol, for Epistemic Utility for Imprecise Probability (€1,490,433 / $1,641,000) David Ludwig, Wageningen University, for Local Ecologies of Knowledge: Towards a Philosophy of Ethnobiology (€1,500,000 / $1,652,000) Rik Peels, Free University of Amsterdam and Medical Centre, for The Epistemology and Ethics of Fundamentalism (details forthcoming) Hanno Sauer, Utrecht University, for The Enemy of the Good: Towards a Theory of Moral Progress (€1,500,000 / $1,652,000) The starting grants program aims to “help individual scientists and scholars to build their own teams and conduct pioneering research across all disciplines.” There’s more information, including links to lists of all of the grant winners, here. The post Philosophers Win ERC Starting Grants appeared first on Daily [More]

Campos Wins Brian Barry Prize

Andre Santos Campos, a research fellow and assistant professor at the Nova Institute of Philosophy at Nova University of Lisbon, has won the 2019 Brian Barry Prize in Political Science. Dr. Campos won the prize for his essay, “Representing the Future: The Interests of Future Persons in Representative Democracy.” The prize is awarded by the British Academy in partnership with Cambridge University Press and the British Journal of Political Science, in which the winning essay will be published. Created in 2014, the prize honors the late Brian Barry, well-known for his work in political and moral philosophy, and who was a founding editor of the journal and a distinguished fellow of the British Academy. As Dr. Campos notes, “Brian Barry was one of the first major political theorists to bring attention to the challenges posed by intergenerational justice to contemporary liberal democracies, especially concerning the future. This is undoubtedly one of the most pressing areas of research in political studies nowadays.” He adds, “To be able to contribute to it with my own research while following Professor Brian Barry’s footsteps is a privilege I accept as carrying great responsibility.” You can read more about this prize, and see a list of previous winners, here.   The post Campos Wins Brian Barry Prize appeared first on Daily [More]

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