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How to construct palindromes

A palindrome is a word or phrase that reads the same way forwards and backwards, like kayak or Madam, I’m Adam. The word comes to us from palindromos, made up of a pair of Greek roots: palin (meaning “again”) and dromos (meaning “way, direction”). The post How to construct palindromes appeared first on [More]

G.E. Moore – his life and work – Philosopher of the Month

G.E. Moore (1873-1958) was a British philosopher, who alongside Bertrand Russell and Ludwig Wittgenstein at Trinity College Cambridge, was a key protagonist in the formation of the analytic tradition and central figure during the “golden age” of philosophy. The post G.E. Moore – his life and work – Philosopher of the Month appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesHow feminism becomes a tool of neo-imperialismIt’s not you, it’s me: the problem of incivilityLGBT Pride month timeline: The 50th anniversary of the Stonewall [More]

How feminism becomes a tool of neo-imperialism

Serene Khader explores the theory of "missionary feminism," a set of epistemic values that creates a filter for the Western world to view the situations of “other” non-Western world women, for gain. The post How feminism becomes a tool of neo-imperialism appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesIt’s not you, it’s me: the problem of incivility#MeToo and Mental Health: Gender Parity in the Field of PsychiatryLGBT Pride month timeline: The 50th anniversary of the Stonewall [More]

It’s not you, it’s me: the problem of incivility

We regularly decry this or that latest episode of incivility, and can thereby find temporary satisfaction. Maybe we feel heartened to see the uncivil criticized, the critique itself a reassurance that incivilities still meet some resistance. Maybe we find relief in collective condemnation of the uncivil, solidarity in shared disapproval. Or maybe we just experience […] The post It’s not you, it’s me: the problem of incivility appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesLGBT Pride month timeline: The 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprisingHow drawing pictures can help us understand wineMad Pride and the end of mental [More]

Michel Foucault on the insane, the criminals, and the sexual deviants

Michel Foucault (1926-84) was one of the most influential and notable French philosophers and historians of ideas, best known for his theories on discourses and the relation of power and knowledge. His seminal works such as L’histoire de la folie à l’âge classique (1972, trs. as History of Madness, 2006), Surveiller et punir (1975, trs. as Discipline and Punish, 1977), and Histoire […] The post Michel Foucault on the insane, the criminals, and the sexual deviants appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesQuiz: How well do you know Albert Camus?Albert Camus and the problem of absurdityFour remarkable LGBTQ [More]

Albert Camus and the problem of absurdity

Albert Camus (1913-1960) was a French philosopher and novelist whose works examine the alienation inherent in modern life and who is best known for his philosophical concept of the absurd. He explored these ideas in his famous novels, The Stranger (1942), The Plague (1947), and The Fall (1956), as well as his philosophical essays, The Myth of Sisyphus (1942) and The Rebel (1951). […] The post Albert Camus and the problem of absurdity appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesThe Mysterious Case of the Disappearing ExistentialistImitation in literature: inspiration or plagiarism?Should the people always get what they want from their [More]

How Rabindranath Tagore reshaped Indian philosophy and literature

Rabindranath Tagore (1861-1941) was a highly prolific Indian poet, philosopher, writer, and educator who wrote novels, essays, plays, and poetic works in colloquial Bengali. He was a key figure of the Bengal Renaissance, a cultural nationalist movement in the city. The post How Rabindranath Tagore reshaped Indian philosophy and literature appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesPhilosopher of The Month: William James (timeline)Celebrating notable women in philosophy: Philippa FootPhilosopher of the month: Saint Thomas Aquinas [More]

Racist jokes may be worse than racist statements

Jane Austen’s Emma Woodhouse tells her father, “Mr. Knightley loves to find fault with me, you know—in a joke—it is all a joke.” Mr. Knightley isn’t joking, as he and Emma know; he presents his criticisms without a hint of jocularity. But if Emma persuades Mr. Woodhouse to believe Mr. Knightley is joking, he “would not suspect such a circumstance as her not being thought perfect by everyone.” A little over 200 years after Emma was published, the comedian Roseanne Barr defended a racist tweet about Valerie Jarrett, President Obama’s former adviser, in a further tweet, “It’s a joke—”. The post Racist jokes may be worse than racist statements appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesWhy Robinson Crusoe is really an urban taleExplaining Freud’s concept of the uncannyIs it right to use intuition as [More]

Explaining Freud’s concept of the uncanny

According to his friend and biographer Ernest Jones Sigmund Freud was fond regaling him with “strange or uncanny experiences with patients.” Freud had a “particular relish” for such stories. 2019 marks the centenary of the publication of Freud’s essay, “The ‘Uncanny.’” Although much has been written on the essay during that time, Freud’s concept of the uncanny is often not well understood. The post Explaining Freud’s concept of the uncanny appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesWhen the movie is not like the book: faithfulness in adaptationsWhat can we learn from meme culture?12 of the most important books for women in [More]

12 of the most important books for women in philosophy

To celebrate women's enormous contributions to philosophy, here is a reading list of books that explore recent feminist philosophy and women philosophers. Despite their apparent invisibility in the field in the past, women have been practising philosophers for centuries. The post 12 of the most important books for women in philosophy appeared first on OUPblog.         Related StoriesNational Women’s History Month: A Brief HistoryIs it right to use intuition as evidence?Harold Wilson’s resignation honours – why so [More]

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