Unequivocal Justice

2017.10.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher Freiman, Unequivocal Justice, Routledge, 2017, 157 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138628229. Reviewed by Andrew I.
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2017.10.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christopher Freiman, Unequivocal Justice, Routledge, 2017, 157 pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138628229. Reviewed by Andrew I. Cohen, Georgia State University John Rawls famously defends two principles of justice as those to which free and equal persons would agree. These principles apply to the basic structure of society. The basic structure includes the norms and institutions determining fundamental "rights, liberties, and opportunities" that any person needs, regardless of her particular aims.[1] In his engaging and provocative book, Christopher Freiman argues that Rawlsians often wrongly dismiss free market systems as vehicles for realizing justice. Rawlsians are guilty of a "self-obviating idealization" (11): they assume an injustice makes robust redistributive states necessary, but ignore how that injustice perverts state institutions. Though Freiman might not convince many Rawlsians, he poses an. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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