Loyalty

[Revised entry by John Kleinig on October 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Loyalty is usually seen as a virtue, albeit a problematic one. It is constituted centrally by perseverance
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[Revised entry by John Kleinig on October 16, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Loyalty is usually seen as a virtue, albeit a problematic one. It is constituted centrally by perseverance in an association to which a person has become intrinsically committed as a matter of his or her identity. Its paradigmatic expression is found in close friendship, to which loyalty is integral, but many other relationships and associations seek to encourage it as an aspect of affiliation or membership: families expect it, organizations often demand it, and...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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