Underdetermination of Scientific Theory

[Revised entry by Kyle Stanford on October 12, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] At the heart of the underdetermination of scientific theory by evidence is the simple idea
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[Revised entry by Kyle Stanford on October 12, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] At the heart of the underdetermination of scientific theory by evidence is the simple idea that the evidence available to us at a given time may be insufficient to determine what beliefs we should hold in response to it. In a textbook example, if all I know is that you spent $10 on apples and oranges and that apples cost $1 while oranges cost $2, then I know that you did not buy six oranges, but I do not know whether you bought one orange and eight apples, two oranges and six apples, and so on. A simple scientific example can be...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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