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Love's Enlightenment: Rethinking Charity in Modernity

2017.09.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ryan Patrick Hanley, Love's Enlightenment: Rethinking Charity in Modernity, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 182pp., $99.99
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2017.09.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Ryan Patrick Hanley, Love's Enlightenment: Rethinking Charity in Modernity, Cambridge University Press, 2017, 182pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107105225. Reviewed by Deborah Boyle, College of Charleston Ryan Patrick Hanley's book offers a carefully researched, interesting, and original survey of how four enlightenment philosophers transformed the traditional Christian ideal of what is variously called agape, caritas, or neighborly love. In particular, Hanley argues that Hume, Rousseau, Smith, and Kant developed, each in his own way, conceptions of other-directed sentiment that sought to mitigate egocentrism without appealing to the sort of self-transcendence required in the traditional Christian view. "Love is in the air," Hanley observes in his opening sentence, referring to recent books on love in philosophy, psychology, and history. Indeed, a number of journal articles published over the past five years. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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