Smile like you mean it

"With a camera you can go into the stomach of a kangaroo," mused Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. "But to look at the human face, I think, is the most fascinating." It is hard to contest Bergman’s
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“With a camera you can go into the stomach of a kangaroo,” mused Swedish director Ingmar Bergman. “But to look at the human face, I think, is the most fascinating.” It is hard to contest Bergman’s claim that “the great gift of cinematography is the human face” – or at least that it is one such gift. The face has long been an important subject in painterly and photographic portraiture, and it surely plays an important role in many forms of theater. Through its capacity to capture movement, to frame the face with unprecedented intimacy, and to render drama through facial expression, however, the art of film subsumes and intensifies the ancient artistic preoccupation with the face. Denis Lavant in Rabbit in Your Headlights (Jonathan Glazer, 1998). It is not all about expression though. Often enough, the sheer look of a face is enough to capture our attention, from the varieties of beauty the world of filmmaking constantly parades before us, to the. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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