Moral Particularism

[Revised entry by Jonathan Dancy on September 22, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Moral Particularism, at its most trenchant, is the claim that there are no defensible moral principles,
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[Revised entry by Jonathan Dancy on September 22, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Moral Particularism, at its most trenchant, is the claim that there are no defensible moral principles, that moral thought does not consist in the application of moral principles to cases, and that the morally perfect person should not be conceived as the person of principle. There are more cautious versions, however. The strongest defensible version, perhaps, holds that though there may be some moral principles, still the rationality of moral thought and judgement in no way depends...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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