Infrequently asked questions: The Monologic Imagination

In the online age, a tried and true method of conveying a lot of information succinctly is the “Frequently Asked Questions” portion of a webpage. In the spirit of honesty and forthrightness, we’re
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In the online age, a tried and true method of conveying a lot of information succinctly is the “Frequently Asked Questions” portion of a webpage. In the spirit of honesty and forthrightness, we’re naming our contribution to this blog “Infrequently Asked Questions.”. The topic we are focusing on is monologism, the practice of presenting one’s voice as pure and singular, unquestionably true, and, in the case of groups, unified. Monologism is a common feature of religious and political projects. Q: Dialogism is “in” at the moment–indeed, has been in for a few decades. It’s synonymous with cherished notions like democracy, consultation, transparency, and pluralism. Why are you doing something so retro?    A: We (Tomlinson and Millie) worked together at Monash University in Australia and shared an interest about monological projects. By this, we mean speech and other representational practices in which people not only assert their singular rightness but also try to. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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