Epistemic Paradoxes

[Revised entry by Roy Sorensen on September 7, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Epistemic paradoxes are riddles that turn on the concept of knowledge (episteme is Greek for knowledge).
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[Revised entry by Roy Sorensen on September 7, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Epistemic paradoxes are riddles that turn on the concept of knowledge (episteme is Greek for knowledge). Typically, there are conflicting, well-credentialed answers to these questions (or pseudo-questions). Thus the riddle immediately informs us of an inconsistency. In the long run, the riddle goads and guides us into correcting at least one deep error - if not directly about knowledge, then about its kindred concepts such as justification, rational belief, and evidence....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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