Aesthetic Disinterestedness: Art, Experience, and the Self

2017.08.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Thomas Hilgers, Aesthetic Disinterestedness: Art, Experience, and the Self, Routledge, 2017, xv + 190pp., $ 140.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.08.16 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Thomas Hilgers, Aesthetic Disinterestedness: Art, Experience, and the Self, Routledge, 2017, xv + 190pp., $ 140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138905009. Reviewed by Richard Eldridge, Swarthmore College Ever since the avant-garde movements of the early part of the twentieth century, and increasingly since the mid-1960s with its explosions of conceptual art, performance art, installation art, and video art (all against a background of social turmoil), advanced art has been predominantly political and cognitive. It has undertaken, often brutally, to tell truths about traumas, repressed subjectivities, and forms of oppression. Over the last thirty-five or so years, marked by Arthur Danto's epochal 1981 The Transfiguration of the Commonplace, in which Danto explicitly rejected aesthetic conceptions of art and challenged the aesthetic theories of Dewey and Beardsley, the philosophy of art has largely followed suit. (Noël. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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