Justice as a Virtue: A Thomistic Perspective

2017.08.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jean Porter, Justice as a Virtue: A Thomistic Perspective, Eerdmans, 2016, 300pp., $40 (pbk), ISBN 9780802873255.   Reviewed
Philosophy News image
2017.08.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jean Porter, Justice as a Virtue: A Thomistic Perspective, Eerdmans, 2016, 300pp., $40 (pbk), ISBN 9780802873255.   Reviewed by Stephen Chanderbhan, Canisius College Is justice primarily a virtue that institutions can have; or is it primarily a virtue that persons can have? Many thinkers take the former to be true. For example, on most social contract accounts (e.g., Rawls’s), justice is characterized first in terms of principles that help to structure a community. People are seen as just or unjust based on their actions relative to those principles. Thinkers in the Thomistic tradition, on the other hand, take justice to be primarily something that persons can have -- a virtue. Accordingly, a couple questions may be asked of Thomistic thinkers: first, what does it even mean for justice to be a virtue; and, second, how would a Thomistic view of justice resemble other traditions’... Read More

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

blog comments powered by Disqus