Insolubles

[Revised entry by Paul Vincent Spade and Stephen Read on August 7, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] The medieval name for paradoxes like the famous Liar Paradox ("This
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[Revised entry by Paul Vincent Spade and Stephen Read on August 7, 2017. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] The medieval name for paradoxes like the famous Liar Paradox ("This proposition is false") was "insolubles" or insolubilia, [1] though besides semantic paradoxes, they included epistemic paradoxes, e.g., "You do not know this proposition". From the late-twelfth century to the end of the Middle Ages and beyond, such paradoxes were discussed at length by an enormous number of authors....

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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