Anomaly v Huemer on Immigration

People often assume that to allow immigration is an act of charity: a country generously sharing its land and institutions with outsiders who have no real claim to be there.  Michael Huemer's
Philosophy News image
People often assume that to allow immigration is an act of charity: a country generously sharing its land and institutions with outsiders who have no real claim to be there.  Michael Huemer's work forcefully upends this assumption, showing that immigration restrictions are in fact a form of harmful coercion (like blocking a starving man from accessing a public market where he could trade for food). This reconceptualisation shifts the argumentative "burden", insofar as we generally accept that it is much more difficult to justify coercively harming someone (a seeming rights-violation) than to merely refrain from assisting them.Jonny Anomaly, in a recent blog post on the issue, seems to miss this key feature of Huemer's argument, instead characterizing Huemer's argument in terms of "mutually beneficial gains", and responding that "although a small number of voluntary transactions may benefit all parties, this does not entail that a large series of transactions will. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Philosophy, et cetera

blog comments powered by Disqus