Kant's Inferentialism: The Case Against Hume

2017.07.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Landy, Kant's Inferentialism: The Case Against Hume, Routledge, 2015, 308pp., $49.95, ISBN 9781138062795. Reviewed by
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2017.07.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Landy, Kant's Inferentialism: The Case Against Hume, Routledge, 2015, 308pp., $49.95, ISBN 9781138062795. Reviewed by Timothy Rosenkoetter, Dartmouth College The interpretation on offer in this ambitious work is an attempt to build upon the insight that "Kant's theory is of a piece with Hume's: they are both theories according to which complex states of affairs are represented as such by forming pictures of such states of affairs" (107), pictures that Kant calls "intuitions." Moreover, Kant, in insisting against Hume that there is a species of representation that is categorically different from images, is not proposing a wholly independent mode of representation, as one finds in the classical rationalists. Instead, Kant conceives of the ability of concepts to represent as parasitic on the representational power of intuitions. While intuitions represent objects, "what a concept represents is not an. . .

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