The Social Contexts of Intellectual Virtue: Knowledge as a Team Achievement

2017.07.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Adam Green, The Social Contexts of Intellectual Virtue: Knowledge as a Team Achievement, Routledge, 2017, 245pp., $140.00 (hbk),
Philosophy News image
2017.07.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Adam Green, The Social Contexts of Intellectual Virtue: Knowledge as a Team Achievement, Routledge, 2017, 245pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138236356. Reviewed by Joshua C. Thurow, The University of Texas at San Antonio Virtue epistemology, of the sort developed by Ernest Sosa and John Greco, has risen to become one of the most plausible accounts of knowledge, competing alongside evidentialism, reliabilism, and Williamson-style knowledge-first epistemology. But like these other views, virtue epistemology has been developed primarily from an individualistic perspective on knowledge: a single person, using his or her epistemic abilities, coming to a belief. Adam Green thinks that taking a more social perspective will produce a richer and more plausible version of virtue epistemology -- one that can avoid various objections to credit views of knowledge and that can deepen our understanding of both epistemic. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

blog comments powered by Disqus