Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion

2017.07.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Richard Kenneth Atkins, Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion, Cambridge University
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2017.07.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Richard Kenneth Atkins, Peirce and the Conduct of Life: Sentiment and Instinct in Ethics and Religion, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 231pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107161306. Reviewed by  Diana B. Heney, Fordham University Richard Kenneth Atkins presents an articulation and defense of the practical philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce. He begins by acknowledging the rather large elephant in the room: Peirce is “not well known for his practical philosophy” (1). The overarching purpose of this volume is to correct the view that what Peirce has to offer by way of advice for the conduct of life is minimal at best. The project is an ambitious one, for this view has been widespread even among Peirce scholars and historians of American pragmatism. Indeed, perhaps the most common view has been that what Peirce does offer concerning conduct is not merely minimal, but also positively unsavoury. By presenting and. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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