In Defense of Moral Luck: Why Luck Often Affects Praiseworthiness and Blameworthiness

2017.06.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Robert J. Hartman, In Defense of Moral Luck: Why Luck Often Affects Praiseworthiness and Blameworthiness, Routledge, 2017,
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2017.06.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Robert J. Hartman, In Defense of Moral Luck: Why Luck Often Affects Praiseworthiness and Blameworthiness, Routledge, 2017, 152pp., $112.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138293441.   Reviewed by Steven D. Hales, Bloomsburg University The central thesis of this book is a traditional one: that there are kinds of resultant, circumstantial, and constitutive luck that help determine a person's praiseworthiness and blameworthiness (p. 90). In other words, moral luck is a real thing and matters for moral assessment. Of course, this idea has been picked at from various quarters ever since 1971, and there is a lot of material to review and rebut. Robert J. Hartman's book is packed with argument, and he seems to have read -- and determined to respond to -- the entirety of the moral luck literature. The plus side is that anyone with some interest in moral luck will find a discussion of their corner of the debate. There... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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