English idioms and The British Apollo

In 1708, London witnessed the appearance of The British Apollo, or Curious Amusements for the INGENIOUS. To which are Added the most Material Occurrences Foreign and Domestick. Perform’d by a
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In 1708, London witnessed the appearance of The British Apollo, or Curious Amusements for the INGENIOUS. To which are Added the most Material Occurrences Foreign and Domestick. Perform’d by a Society of GENTLEMEN. VOL. I. Printed for the Authors, by F. Mayo, at the Printing-Press, against Water-Lane in Fleet-Street. This is Apollo, though not the British one. As far as I know, no Volume 2 followed this remarkable publication. Volume 1 ran into several editions and is now available on the Internet. Not being a specialist in the history of English journalism, I came across this remarkable book by chance, through a reference in a footnote. (But such is the way of all scholarly flesh.) One cannot imagine a more unusual product by a society of gentlemen. In a way, The British Apollo looks like a forerunner of Notes and Queries (launched in 1849): it contains questions and answers, but the answers are provided by anonymous authors, while in Notes and Queries, all contributions are signed,. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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