Three Streams: Confucian Reflections on Learning and the Moral Heart-Mind in China, Korea, and Japan

2017.06.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Philip J. Ivanhoe, Three Streams: Confucian Reflections on Learning and the Moral Heart-Mind in China, Korea, and Japan, Oxford
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2017.06.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Philip J. Ivanhoe, Three Streams: Confucian Reflections on Learning and the Moral Heart-Mind in China, Korea, and Japan, Oxford University Press, 2016, 250pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190492014. Reviewed by Hui Chieh Loy, National University of Singapore This book begins by invoking Whitehead's "safest general characterization of the European philosophical tradition" as consisting in "a series of footnotes to Plato" to make the point that many of the concerns and approaches that continue to drive contemporary Anglo-American philosophy remain defined by their remote roots in Plato's dialogues. Similarly, Philip J. Ivanhoe argues, the trajectory of the Confucian tradition has its ultimate source in the approaches to the Way (dào) deployed by the early thinker Mencius (or Mèngzǐ, 391-308 BCE), who was second only to Confucius himself as a founder of the tradition. Within this larger theme, Ivanhoe's book tells. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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