Sources of Knowledge: On the Concept of a Rational Capacity for Knowledge

2017.05.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Andrea Kern, Sources of Knowledge: On the Concept of a Rational Capacity for Knowledge, Daniel Smyth (tr.), Harvard University
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2017.05.23 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Andrea Kern, Sources of Knowledge: On the Concept of a Rational Capacity for Knowledge, Daniel Smyth (tr.), Harvard University Press, 2017, 295pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780674416116. Reviewed by Allan Hazlett, University of New Mexico In this impressive book, Andrea Kern offers a response to philosophical skepticism and an account of the nature of knowledge. Her leading idea is that knowledge is an act of a "rational capacity for knowledge," the exercise of which provides the knower with "truth-guaranteeing grounds" for belief, such as your perceiving that there is a tree in the quad, which grounds your knowledge that there is a tree in the quad. Kern presents her argument as a series of Kantian insights, which makes the book an important one, representing an admirable effort to bring Kant's epistemology into dialogue with contemporary analytic epistemology, on which Descartes and Hume have (you might think). . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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