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Thinking with Kant's Critique of Judgment

2017.05.03 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michel Chaouli, Thinking with Kant's Critique of Judgment, Harvard University Press, 2017, 312pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.05.03 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michel Chaouli, Thinking with Kant's Critique of Judgment, Harvard University Press, 2017, 312pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780674971363. Reviewed by Samantha Matherne, University of California, Santa Cruz Michel Chaouli offers an eloquent yet honest apology for Kant's third Critique, defending its continued value in the face of criticism from many sides. And the sides are, indeed, many. Over and above the general difficulty of Kant's language, many of the key terms around which Kant builds his theory of aesthetic experience, like 'beauty', 'taste', and 'pleasure', can seem outdated. More hostility still is garnered by his imperious-sounding claim that judgments of taste are 'universal' and 'necessary'. Even among those more sympathetic to his view, there arise concerns over Kant's formalism and the coherence of his analysis of the beauty of nature and art. What is more, these are only concerns internal to his. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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