post-truth" was coined in 1992, the malady is not new. And postmodernism isn't to blame. The problem isn't about epistemology; it's about identity" href="/post/2017/08/21/Though-lt;stronggt;post-truthlt;stronggt;-was-coined-in-1992-the-malady-is-not-new-And-postmodernism-isnt-to-blame-The-problem-isnt-about-epistemology;-its-about-identity.aspx" />

Technology and the Virtues: A Philosophical Guide to a Future Worth Wanting

2017.04.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Shannon Vallor, Technology and the Virtues: A Philosophical Guide to a Future Worth Wanting, Oxford University Press, 2016,
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2017.04.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Shannon Vallor, Technology and the Virtues: A Philosophical Guide to a Future Worth Wanting, Oxford University Press, 2016, 309pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780190498511. Reviewed by Benjamin I. Huff, Randolph-Macon College Shannon Vallor makes a compelling argument for renewing the cultivation of the virtues in order to meet the challenges of our technological age. She argues on the one hand that rapid technological change creates a special need for moral virtues to guide us in choosing among our many possible futures, and in managing new and unexpected opportunities and hazards. On the other hand, she argues that changes in technology create new challenges to the cultivation of virtue itself which call for wise and creative responses. Vallor takes a comprehensive approach, addressing both theory and applications. In Part I, she articulates the need for "a technomoral virtue ethic of global scope" (64) to guide. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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