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The Virtue Ethics of Hume and Nietzsche

2017.04.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christine Swanton, The Virtue Ethics of Hume and Nietzsche, Wiley Blackwell, 2015, 277pp., $99.95 (hbk), ISBN 9781118939390.
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2017.04.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christine Swanton, The Virtue Ethics of Hume and Nietzsche, Wiley Blackwell, 2015, 277pp., $99.95 (hbk), ISBN 9781118939390. Reviewed by Craig Beam, Wilfrid Laurier University This book, part of the New Directions in Ethics series, argues that Hume and Nietzsche should be interpreted as virtue ethicists, that they have much in common, and that they provide useful supplements to classical aretaic theories. In the first two chapters, Christine Swanton argues that virtue ethics should be seen as a group of moral theories with different origins, rather than having a single progenitor in Aristotle (20). Hume and Nietzsche alike seek to rescue conceptions of the good life from an underpinning in religious morality and associated doctrines (6). Both are naturalists, and after discussing several senses of naturalism, Swanton defines them as "spare naturalists" (9). She argues that Hume should be read as a "response. . .

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