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De Anima

2017.04.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Aristotle, De Anima, Christopher Shields (tr., intro., comm.), Oxford University Press, 2016, 415pp., $32.00 (pbk), ISBN
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2017.04.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Aristotle, De Anima, Christopher Shields (tr., intro., comm.), Oxford University Press, 2016, 415pp., $32.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780199243457. Reviewed by Hendrik Lorenz, Princeton University "The Clarendon Aristotle series," Christopher Shields writes, "takes as its mission a plain, forthright exposition of Aristotle's philosophy for the engaged Greekless reader rather than the professional philologist" (xlvi f.). In keeping with this mission, the present work offers a substantive introduction, a new translation, a commentary, and a glossary. The work's introduction begins by briefly describing the topics that Aristotle tackles in his treatise on the soul. Aristotle conceives of the soul (psukhē) as principle of life, as what by its presence is responsible for the various kinds of vital activities that the different kinds of living things engage in. So, Aristotle's topics in the De Anima (DA) include the nature. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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