post-truth" was coined in 1992, the malady is not new. And postmodernism isn't to blame. The problem isn't about epistemology; it's about identity" href="/post/2017/08/21/Though-lt;stronggt;post-truthlt;stronggt;-was-coined-in-1992-the-malady-is-not-new-And-postmodernism-isnt-to-blame-The-problem-isnt-about-epistemology;-its-about-identity.aspx" />

Tolerance among the Virtues

2017.04.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John R. Bowlin, Tolerance among the Virtues, Princeton University Press, 2016, 265pp., $39.50 (hbk), ISBN 9780691169972.
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2017.04.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John R. Bowlin, Tolerance among the Virtues, Princeton University Press, 2016, 265pp., $39.50 (hbk), ISBN 9780691169972. Reviewed by Iskra Fileva, University of Colorado, Boulder There is a popular view of tolerance -- perhaps more frequently accepted implicitly than argued for -- on which tolerance is an idiosyncrasy of liberal societies. Most societies, this story goes, are intolerant: they attempt to regulate too much of our personal lives and end up meddling with what is best left to individual choice -- religion, clothing, hairstyles, and so on. Liberal societies, by contrast, leave such aspects of life as religion or dress up to the individual. The locus classicus for this view of tolerance is probably John Locke's Letter Concerning Toleration. In that piece, Locke endorses religious diversity, arguing that spiritual salvation is none of the state's business. Ever since Locke, we have been adding. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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