Perceptual Learning

[New Entry by Kevin Connolly on April 5, 2017.] "Perceptual Learning" refers, roughly, to long-lasting changes in perception that result from practice or experience (see E.J. Gibson 1963). William
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[New Entry by Kevin Connolly on April 5, 2017.] "Perceptual Learning" refers, roughly, to long-lasting changes in perception that result from practice or experience (see E.J. Gibson 1963). William James, for instance, writes about how a person can become able to differentiate by taste between the upper and lower half of a bottle for a particular kind of wine (1890: 509). Assuming that the change in the person's perception lasts, is genuinely perceptual (rather than, say, a learned inference), and is based on prior experience, James' case is a case of perceptual...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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