Perspectives on Ignorance from Moral and Social Philosophy

2017.04.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rik Peels (ed.), Perspectives on Ignorance from Moral and Social Philosophy, Routledge, 2017, 246pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2017.04.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Rik Peels (ed.), Perspectives on Ignorance from Moral and Social Philosophy, Routledge, 2017, 246pp., $140.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781138945661. Reviewed by Chad Flanders, Saint Louis University School of Law The blurb for this book says that ignorance in moral and social philosophy is "undertheorized" in contemporary analytic philosophy. This has the air of a paradox -- can we really know more about what we don't know? -- but is no more paradoxical than saying we need to think more about the category of the "unthinkable," or that we need to be more skeptical about "skepticism." What the blurb invites, though, is a question about what it is about ignorance that needs to be more "theorized." Ignorance comes up in a variety of discrete contexts, e.g., in law and ethics and epistemology. Is there something about the idea of ignorance that is worth sustained treatment in its own right, separate and apart from when... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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