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Why Inequality Matters: Luck Egalitarianism, Its Meaning and Value

2017.03.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Shlomi Segall, Why Inequality Matters: Luck Egalitarianism, Its Meaning and Value, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 256pp.,
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2017.03.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Shlomi Segall, Why Inequality Matters: Luck Egalitarianism, Its Meaning and Value, Cambridge University Press, 2016, 256pp., $99.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107129818. Reviewed by Alex Voorhoeve, London School of Economics Shlomi Segall's new book contains many novel ideas. It should engage researchers with an interest in debates between luck egalitarians and two of their principal opponents, prioritarians and sufficientarians.[1] While, as I shall argue below, not all of its arguments succeed, it also makes contributions which deserve to profoundly influence debates on distributive justice. I will first summarize the book's central points and then evaluate some of its arguments. Segall's project is to offer a theory of the value of a distribution of well-being. This theory is meant to establish what decision-makers should do insofar as their proper aim is to maximize this value (or to maximize expected value, if. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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