Jonathan Meades. It is a cult of "puritanical, po-faced, censorious nothingness"" href="/post/2017/10/20/The-fate-of-artists-and-of-art-itself-is-in-the-hands-of-too-few-persons-who-share-kindred-tastes-and-cultish-dogma-says-lt;stronggt;Jonathan-Meadeslt;stronggt;-It-is-a-cult-of-puritanical-po-faced-censorious-nothingness.aspx" />

Spelling and knowhow: the oddest English spellings, part 23

We are so used to the horrors of English spelling that experience no inconvenience at reading the word knowhow. Why don’t know and how rhyme if they look so similar? Because such is life. The post
Philosophy News image
We are so used to the horrors of English spelling that experience no inconvenience at reading the word knowhow. Why don’t know and how rhyme if they look so similar? Because such is life. In addition to the ignominious bow, as in low bow, one can have two strings to one’s bow, and I witnessed an incident at a hockey game, when a certain Mr. Prow kicked up a row, complaining of an inconvenient row, but the crowd pacified him, and, as a result, he had to eat crow. By the way, the man’s family name Prow, as he later told me, is pronounced with the vowel of grow, not of prowess or proud. In return, I explained to him that prow (a ship’s forepart) rhymed with grow for centuries and then changed its pronunciation, perhaps to align itself with bow (which bow? Its synonym of course) or for another equally obscure reason (see below). Such changes are trivial. More surprising is the fact that millions of people who are ready to protest anything on the slightest provocation tolerate English. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

blog comments powered by Disqus