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How and when to quote

I have a confession to make. I often skip the long blocks of quotes when I am reading academic articles and books. I suspect that I'm not the only one who does this. I don't skip the quotes because
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I have a confession to make. I often skip the long blocks of quotes when I am reading academic articles and books. I suspect that I’m not the only one who does this. I don’t skip the quotes because I’m lazy. I skip them because they often pull me away from a writer’s ideas rather than further into them. The writer has put a voice and an idea in my ear only to cede the floor to another voice, that of some quoted authority. A long quote, or worse, a series of them, can leave me asking “Yes, but what was your point again?” How does all this over-quoting arise? In school, teachers require beginning writers to cite sources in their summaries, paraphrases, and direct quotations, but some students confuse research with mere quotation and the weakest of them write research papers consisting of a series of whole paragraphs quoted from different sources. Like this: Quotations are used for a variety of reasons: to illuminate the meaning or to support the arguments. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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