Ineffable facts, deep ignorance, and the sub-algebra hypothesis: Part 2

If there are any ineffable facts, then it is striking that they essentially are nowhere to be found. It is natural to think of ineffable facts as rare, radical exceptions, something unusual, maybe
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If there are any ineffable facts, then it is striking that they essentially are nowhere to be found. It is natural to think of ineffable facts as rare, radical exceptions, something unusual, maybe something tied to consciousness, or art, or paradoxes. But why would that be justified? There might be lots of ineffable fact, and they might be all around us. The natural motivation for why we should think that there are any ineffable facts would seem to support this more ubiquitous conception of them. The squirrel is surrounded by facts ineffable for it. It even might live on the window sill of the Athens unemployment office, but the fact that there is an economic crisis in Greece is beyond what it can represent. It would be deeply ignorant of facts pertaining to where it lives and what is going on right around it. And similarly, we might be in the middle of something that we are deeply ignorant of and which is beyond what we can represent. But if so, this somehow doesn’t seem to come up. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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