Ineffable facts, deep ignorance, and the sub-algebra hypothesis: Part 1

There are many things we do not know, but sometimes our ignorance runs deeper than other times. The post Ineffable facts, deep ignorance, and the sub-algebra hypothesis: Part 1 appeared first on
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There are many things we do not know, but sometimes our ignorance runs deeper than other times. In regular cases of ignorance we can ask a particular question, but we can’t figure out what the answer is. Furthermore, for some such cases we are bound to always remain ignorant, and we know it. Is the number of T. Rex that ever lived odd or even? We will never know, that information is lost in time, but, of course, in this case it won’t matter what the answer is. However, in other cases our ignorance might go further and there it might matter a lot. Sometimes we might not merely be unable to answer a question, but we might be unable to ask the question in the first place. To illustrate this possibility, it is important to make vivid that every time we come to know something we need to complete two quite separate tasks, each of which is an achievement: one is to be able to represent the world, the other to find out that this representation is accurate. For example, when I come to know. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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