Implicit Bias and Philosophy, Volume 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology

2017.01.06 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael Brownstein and Jennifer Saul (eds.), Implicit Bias and Philosophy, Volume 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology, Oxford
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2017.01.06 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Michael Brownstein and Jennifer Saul (eds.), Implicit Bias and Philosophy, Volume 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology, Oxford University Press, 2016, 316pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198713241. Reviewed by Chloë FitzGerald, University of Geneva Implicit associations are characterised variously as unconscious, uncontrollable, non-introspectable, or arational mental processes, some of which may influence our judgements resulting in undesirable bias. These implicit biases occur between a group or category attribute, such as being black, and a thin negative evaluation, such as 'bad' -- 'implicit prejudice' in the psychology literature -- or another, thicker evaluation/category attribute, such as 'violent' -- 'implicit stereotype' in the psychology literature.[1] They manifest themselves particularly in our non-verbal behaviour towards others, such as in frequency of eye contact and physical proximity, but also. . .

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