The logic of unreliable narrators

In fiction, an unreliable narrator is a narrator whose credibility is in doubt – in other words, a proper reading of a narrative with an unreliable narrator requires that the audience question the
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In fiction, an unreliable narrator is a narrator whose credibility is in doubt – in other words, a proper reading of a narrative with an unreliable narrator requires that the audience question the accuracy of the narrator’s representation of the story, and take seriously the idea that what actually happens in the story – what is fictionally true in the narrative – is different from what is being said or shown to them. Unreliable narrators are common in fiction. Notable examples include Agatha Christie’s The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Akira Kurosawa’s Rashômon, and Ron Howard’s A Beautiful Mind. There are all sorts of interesting philosophical questions one might ask about unreliable narrators and how they function as a storytelling device. Here, however, I am going to point out some purely logical features of unreliable narrators. Presumably, although the full account is no doubt more complex, one of the primary factors that determines. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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