Liar Paradox

[Revised entry by Jc Beall, Michael Glanzberg, and David Ripley on December 12, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The first sentence in this essay is a lie. There is something odd about
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[Revised entry by Jc Beall, Michael Glanzberg, and David Ripley on December 12, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The first sentence in this essay is a lie. There is something odd about saying so, as has been known since ancient times. To see why, remember that all lies are untrue. Is the first sentence true? If it is, then it is a lie, and so it is not true. Conversely, suppose that it is not true. We (viz., the authors) have said it, and normally things are said with the intention of being believed. Saying something that way when it is untrue is a lie. But then, given what the sentence says, it is true after all!...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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