Jonathan Meades. It is a cult of "puritanical, po-faced, censorious nothingness"" href="/post/2017/10/20/The-fate-of-artists-and-of-art-itself-is-in-the-hands-of-too-few-persons-who-share-kindred-tastes-and-cultish-dogma-says-lt;stronggt;Jonathan-Meadeslt;stronggt;-It-is-a-cult-of-puritanical-po-faced-censorious-nothingness.aspx" />

What Burton’s ‘Anatomy of Melancholy’ tells us about modern day mood disorders

Coming to us through the great illustrative tradition, as well as medical and literary works, Melancholy is a perennially alluring idea. The post What Burton’s ‘Anatomy of Melancholy’
Philosophy News image
Coming to us through the great illustrative tradition, as well as medical and literary works, Melancholy is a perennially alluring idea. Still, the thought that a seventeenth-century work on melancholy by neither a doctor nor a philosopher could illuminate twenty-first-century concerns about mood disorders–my contention about Burton’s Anatomy of Melancholy–may seem a bit far-fetched. Whatever its genre (and Burton’s 1621 book has been seen as a literary work, an encyclopedia, a satire, a political tract, a health manual and much besides), and despite Burton’s identification with the pre-Socratic philosopher Democritus who sought the seat of melancholy by dissecting animals, shown below by Rosa in 1650, we don’t usually assign The Anatomy of Melancholy a place alongside the great Early Modern philosophical treatises. Notably extra-philosophical, and undoubtedly less incisively systematic or original than that by such as Hobbes, Locke, Descartes, or Spinoza, Burton’s writing is. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

blog comments powered by Disqus