The Literal-Nonliteral Distinction in Classical Indian Philosophy

[New Entry by Malcolm Keating on November 26, 2016.] Indian thinkers demarcate the boundaries between literal and non-literal meaning early in their history. They do so within different
Philosophy News image
[New Entry by Malcolm Keating on November 26, 2016.] Indian thinkers demarcate the boundaries between literal and non-literal meaning early in their history. They do so within different intellectual genres, each broadly philosophical, but with varying emphases. Within the grammatical genre, Yāska's Semantic Explanation (Nirukta), an early (perhaps 6th century to 3rd century BCE) etymological treatise recognizes the difference between ordinary (laukika) and metaphorical language (upamā). This text, possibly...

Continue reading . . .

News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

blog comments powered by Disqus