The Philosophy Scare: The Politics of Reason in the Early Cold War

2016.11.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John McCumber, The Philosophy Scare: The Politics of Reason in the Early Cold War, University of Chicago Press, 2016, 218pp.,
Philosophy News image
2016.11.13 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John McCumber, The Philosophy Scare: The Politics of Reason in the Early Cold War, University of Chicago Press, 2016, 218pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226396385. Reviewed by George A. Reisch In his influential book, The Rise of Scientific Philosophy of 1951, Hans Reichenbach applauded the arrival of logical positivism for philosophical reasons. In his new book, John McCumber offers a very different account of how and why Reichenbach's style of philosophy displaced its main rivals, pragmatism and continental philosophy. By examining archival files, departmental correspondence, and the records of the California State Senate Fact-Finding Subcommittee on Un-American Activities (CUAC), McCumber contends that the rise of scientific philosophy took place not in some ideal world of competing doctrines, but within two institutions born during the cold war: UCLA, which became autonomous in 1952, and the RAND. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

blog comments powered by Disqus