Lying, tells, and paradox

The idea that many, if not most, people exhibit physical signs – tells – when they lie is an old idea – one that has been extensively studied by psychologists, and is of obvious practical interest
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The idea that many, if not most, people exhibit physical signs – tells – when they lie is an old idea – one that has been extensively studied by psychologists, and is of obvious practical interest to fields as otherwise disparate as gambling and law enforcement. Some of the tells that indicate someone is lying include: Pauses in speech. Providing too much information. Breathing heavily. Covering one’s face. Excessive finger pointing. Throat clearing. Not blinking. Swallowing. Shuffling feet. Tugging on ears. Licking lips. Cleaning glasses. Grooming hair. The psychological research on tells is interesting and important, and knowledge of tells also makes high-stakes poker that much more fun to watch. But what hasn’t been appreciated until now is the fact that philosophy, and in particular, the study of paradoxes, has something to offer with respect to our understanding of tells. Now, in real life, tells are general and not absolute – in other words, people are generally more likely to. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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