“Fog” and a story of unexpected encounters

“Fog everywhere. Fog up the river,… Fog down the river….” This is Dickens (1852). But in 1889 Oscar Wilde insisted that the fogs had appeared in London only when the Impressionists discovered them,
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“Fog everywhere. Fog up the river,… Fog down the river….” This is Dickens (1852). But in 1889 Oscar Wilde insisted that the fogs had appeared in London only when the Impressionists discovered them, that is, they may have been around for centuries, but only thanks to the Impressionists, London experienced a dramatic change in its climate. In my present capacity, I’d rather side with Dickens, because in etymology fog is indeed everywhere: up the river and down the river. Fog itself is a word of obscure origin, and, indeed, how could a word with such a meaning be transparent? If it were, it would not have been called fog. The Impressionists introduced mists to London. Please pay attention to the part of the title dealing with encounters: it is there for a reason. Fog has at least two meanings: one that is common (“a thick mist”) and one that is local “a thick layer of dead grass left as fodder; aftermath”; the latter is also known as fagagio. Fog 2 is current mainly or exclusively in the. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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