The Murder of Truth

“When a man lies, he murders some part of the world.” -Merlin Embed from Getty Images There is an old joke that asks “how do you know a politician is lying?” The answer is, of course, “you can see
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“When a man lies, he murders some part of the world.” -Merlin Embed from Getty Images There is an old joke that asks “how do you know a politician is lying?” The answer is, of course, “you can see his lips moving.” This bit of grim humor illustrates the negative view people generally have of politicians—they are expected to lie relentlessly. However, people still condemn politicians for lying. Or when they believe the politician is lying. At least when the politician is on the other side. In the case of their own side, people often suffer from what seems to be a cognitive malfunction: they believe politicians lie, but generally accept that their side is telling it like it is. This sort of malfunction also extends to the media and other sources of information: it is commonly claimed that the media lies and that sources are biased. That is, when media and sources express views one disagrees with. What matches a person’s world view is embraced, often without any critical. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

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