Spinoza's Physical Theory

[Revised entry by Richard Manning on October 31, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Spinoza's thought stands at an uneasy and volatile period in the development of physical
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[Revised entry by Richard Manning on October 31, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Spinoza's thought stands at an uneasy and volatile period in the development of physical theory. His physical science is largely Cartesian, both in content and rationalistic method. It is harshly dismissive of the "occult qualities, intentional species, substantial forms, and a thousand other trifles" (letter 60, to Boxel) of pre-revolutionary scholastic natural philosophy. It is likewise antagonistic to the new Baconian experimentalism, holding that empirical findings can at best present examples of what reason...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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